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Next nanoToxCom PhD thesis successfully defended

After Mark Geppert, Eva Luther, Darius Arndt, Jonas Baumann and Christian Pade the sixth nanoToxCom graduate Henning Wigger successfully defended his PhD thesis on May 25th, 2016. The topic of his thesis was " Environmental release of and exposure to  iron oxide and silver nanoparticles  Prospective estimations based on product application scenarios"

C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s !

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nanoToxCom

The graduate school nanoToxCom (=Toxic combination effects of synthesized nanoparticles) is located at the University of Bremen and represents the follow up of ToxCom (= Toxic combination effects; graduate school (2002 2007) of the Universities of Bremen and Oldenburg). Both graduate schools have been and are funded by the Hans Böckler Foundation (German Labor Unions). nanoToxCom has started in January 2009. nanoToxCom is further supported by the VCI (Association of the Chemical Industry), the closely linked project "Environmental Competence Nanomaterials, funded by the "Senator für Umwelt, Bau, Verkehr und Europa" in Bremen (Programme "Applied Environmental Research") via the EFRE (European Fonds for Regional Development) and the University of Bremen.

One of our guiding principle is the 4th principle of Green Chemistry:

"Wherever practicable, synthetic methodologies should be designed to use and generate substances that possess little or no toxicity to human health and the environment".

[Anastas, P.T. and Warner, J.C., Green Chemistry Theory and Practice, Oxford University Press, New York , 1998 (The twelve principles of Green Chemistry)]

The aim is to reconcile technological requirements of new substances with a minimization of hazards for man and the environment.

Therefore nanoToxCom aims to contribute to a sound hazard assessment for manufactured nanoparticles by considering their whole life cycle from synthesis to application and disposal to gain deeper insights in the requirements of environmentally more benign particles with two foci:

1) Hazard assessment of selected metallic and metalloxidic nanoparticles n combination with other physical/chemical stressors in relation to selected exposure scenarios

2) Derivation of recommendations for synthesis, processing and distribution of NPs

The group activities are based on specialized knowledge generated by the synergistic interactions of different disciplines such as biochemistry, (bio)organic chemistry, physical chemistry, environmental chemistry, risk assessment, process engineering, cell biology, ecology, eco-toxicology and soil biology.

The following working groups contribute to this graduate school:

 

 

 

 

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